Once Upon a Cold Winter Night…

What a Hippopota-Mess Cover

Winter Greetings!
I’d like to share one of my stories from What a Hippopota-Mess! (compliments of Orca Book Publishers) about a moose who turns blue from the cold. What’s ‘Muckles’ the moose to do when sub-zero temperatures of the Yukon are totally ruining his life? How will he survive year after year? Will he ever be warm again?  Well, put on a fire, curl up with the kids and read all about it. Don’t miss all the fun facts at the end.

Blue Muckles Brown                

by Pat Skene

Away up in the cold white north,
nearby a Yukon town,
there was a moose out on the loose,
they called Blue Muckles Brown.

Folks recognized him right away
because his hide was blue.
His antlers drooped with clumps of ice.
He shivered all day through.

Now, moose lore spread for miles around
about this blue-moose sight.
And tales were told how he was brown,
but changed to blue one night.

They say it happened when the land
was gripped by bitter frost.
When piercing purple skies grew dark,
poor Muckles – he got lost.

Continue reading “Once Upon a Cold Winter Night…”

Halloween Story for Home and Classroom

Rhyme Stones CoverHave you ever met a Halloween witch who couldn’t fly on a broom? What weird things do witches stir into their cauldrons? How did all these scary Halloween traditions get started in the first place?

To answer these questions, I would like to share a story from one of my books.

Halloween for Ernestine is one of six rhyming stories from Rhyme Stones. Read, Print, and Enjoy! (Compliments Orca Book Publishers.) Don’t miss the Interview with Ernestine and cool Halloween facts at the end.

HALLOWEEN FOR ERNESTINE      by Pat Skene

It happened every Halloween –
a little witch called Ernestine
was so afraid of being seen
because she couldn’t fly.
She tried to fly.
Could she be shy?

She sneaked about her witch’s lair,
pretending that she wasn’t there.
She hid behind her orange chair.
But all the witches knew.
She knew they knew.
What could she do?

Continue reading “Halloween Story for Home and Classroom”

The Sewer in the Sewer – Fun with Heteronyms

images-3Double trouble: I’m sorry to subject you to the subject of the english language when you’re probably having a nice soft day. But sometimes I think the word-inventors were verbally insane or just plain lazy. Why else would we have so many words with the same spelling but different pronunciations and meanings? Was the project team simply lacking in brain cells and imagination? Or did they become bored halfway through the job? Perhaps it was an early attempt at recycling to save endangered letters?

These words are called heteronyms.  To better explain what I’m on about, there is no time like the present to present you with my story. Happy reading!


spool threadThe Sewer in the Sewer

Once upon a time, there was a Polish seamstress who liked to stay home and polish her husband’s boots. Okay, so she wasn’t very liberated, but she was working on it. She was a lovely little woman who would shed a tear every time she saw a tear in her man’s work clothes, hanging in the shed. Wasting no time, she would always repair to her sewing room to repair the damage. The little sewer also liked to grow vegetables and could produce lots of produce for her family. But she drew the line at taking out the refuse and would refuse to carry out the garbage. And try as she might, she could never teach the sow to sow. But that’s a story for another time.

Continue reading “The Sewer in the Sewer – Fun with Heteronyms”

A Rhyming Story for Summer Reading

Welcome Parents, Grandparents, Teachers, and everyone in between. 
‘Tis the season for vegetable gardens to burst forth with delicious bounty, while we battle voracious bugs and vicious weeds!  So here is a rhyming story for kids – all about the joys and agonies of summer gardening. And there’s some real cool facts at the end of the story too.

So go ahead –  read, rhyme, recite and share, share, share…

Monster Lunch CoverAn excerpt from Monster Lunch

Written by Pat Skene, Illustrated by Graham Ross
(Orca Book Publishers)  ages 6 -10

 

GRUMPY GARDEN DUDE

Please excuse my attitude,
but you can keep your garden-food.
I think planting is a bore,
when you can buy stuff at the store.

One day my dad said with a grin,
“C’mon, let’s put a garden in.”
I dragged the tools down from the shelf
and kept my feelings to myself.

We found a sunny garden spot.
I worked till I was sweaty hot.
We turned the soil to make a bed.
“Now add manure,” my father said.

“Phew!” I cried. “Give me a break!”
He laughed and handed me the rake.
I sniffed and sniffed but must admit,
it didn’t even stink a bit.

Continue reading “A Rhyming Story for Summer Reading”